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Posts Tagged ‘b&w conversion’

A typical view of the TCT near Salmon River Lake

A few days ago Olivia (youngest daughter) and I went skiing. My current agenda is to try going to places I have not skied before which is a change from my usual impulse to ski on Donahue Lake. Olivia was not interested in dealing with hills so the safest bet was a section of the Trans Canada Trail.

Brook running beside the TCT

We drove to Salmon River Lake, parked (safely) on the side of the road where we could easily access the trail. As we were getting our gear out of the car three snowmobiles went past. They had come from Guysborough Intervale – a route made possible once several lakes freeze. It was nice to see others out enjoying the afternoon, and nicer still when the noise of their machines faded away.

Olivia skiing near Salmon River Lake

Once we were clamped into our skis and moving on the trail another consequence of the snowmobiles quickly made itself known: slushy crud. Each of us ended up with gobs of ice on our skis. This rendered our forward progress painstakingly slow. I didn’t even realize the cause of this poor performance right away. I thought it seemed odd that we were not able to glide when conditions were so favorable. When I finally clued in I used my wax scraper to clear both pairs of skis. Olivia had clumps like small fists on both skis.

Olivia

The section of trail we were on ended up not being especially flat. We encountered several inclines that were tricky to descend. I thought this added nice variety while Olivia would have preferred the trail to remain flat. The trail is closely lined by trees on each side. Unfortunately we ran out of time and had to turn just as we came to an interesting area where the trail borders a few lakes.

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Shed, Charlos Cove

Hindsight is, of course, always 20/20 and in hindsight I really wish I had added keywords incrementally as I added new photos to the database. I am only good for short bursts when I attempt to do this work. I have progressed from April to being part way through the images taken in September. My worst problem is seeing photos I originally ignored but now seem worthy of attention. When I give in to the impulse to work on something the whole business of keywording once again gets pushed aside and left undone. Today I’m presenting one image with variations. Several of the variations derive from ‘recipes’ I’ve created using a combination of individual filters, while several are presets supplied with the software which I apply and then tweak. I feel it is almost always possible to interpret/present a photograph in more than one way.

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Here is a shot taken in June when I was in Little Dover – the original effort was a disaster. The re-worked shot looks nice. It’s the product of nine captures.

Private wharf, Little Dover

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I have been busy doing some behind the scenes house cleaning, mostly a process called keywording, which will allow easy searching of my photos once completed. I should be in the practice of doing this work each time I put new images on my hard drive but I’m always anxious to get directly to the images. I’d rather get through the processing rather than prolong it. Anyway, I’ve been coming across images that were overlooked and today I decided to take one to see what I could do?

Original shot

Original HDR

You can see the original, directly from the camera, is very low contrast and not very attractive. It is one of six frames required to make the entire image. There are three for each half which are used in the HDR rendering, then the two halves are stitched together for the final image.

The HDR version yielded some detail in the sky which is desirable but you can see below the window on the shingles and grass there is a glow. At the time I didn’t consider the photo worth the effort of trying to resolve the problem. When faced with processing a lot of images and wanting to get a good night’s sleep all the images with flaws are discarded or ignored.

Today I thought I would spend a little time to see if I could salvage this one. (more…)

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Barn at sunset, Ogden

Actually I quite like this barn. As I was riding home the other night the sun dipped below the cloud cover to yield about ten minutes of fabulous warm light before setting. It was great timing. I glanced up at the barn as I passed and saw it bathed in the glow, the rusted patina of the roof was irresistible. The motorcycle can be turned far more quickly and safely than a car, it can be parked more easily on the shoulder as well.

Barn at sunset, Ogden

I went through the procedure of exiting my helmet and gloves. I had enough light to handhold so I skipped detaching the tripod. I hurried up to the barn so as not to miss the brief window of opportunity afforded me. Sometimes being in the right spot at the right time makes all the difference. The more time you spend out with a camera the more likely you will be to find yourself in a similar position. It’s not luck so much as better odds.

Barn at sunset, Ogden

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